Tag Archives: gurit

Multi-Purpose eFoiler

Foiling Week has just launched , in cooperation with partners Gurit and Torqeedo a design competition for professional yacht architecture and engineering firms , shipyards and boat builders: The MP eFoiler design challenge is a chance to show the approach for a sustainable and efficient future of marine transportation.

Electric-powered foiling vessels are going to play an increasing role in the near future. From safety and media boats to pleasure crafts and super-yacht tenders. Can we envision the Tesla of marine world?

Participating teams must send a completed registration form by April 15th 2019.

The projects finalists will have the opportunity to present at Foiling Week Forum in Malcesine, Lake Garda 2019, July 10th to 14th.

More info & Entry here

Few days to the first 2018 Foiling Week in Sydney

From January 11th to 14th at Woollahra Sailing Club in Rose Bay, Sydney, a new year of foiling will be celebrated by the first Foiling Week of the 2018. It is the first down-under Foiling Week, in the homeland of the recent foiling renaissance.

As for all Foiling Week events, the program is enriched with an Expo, Trial & Experience Camp. In addition to the usual morning Forum program and the afternoon races, major foiling boat manufacturers will show and demonstrate their creations throughout the day.

A Class, Moth, Waszp and other new foiling boats like the Superfoiler will have class racing in the harbor during the afternoon. Thanks to Marlow and SLAM, there will be a long distance race for all the foiling boats, in an all against all showdown, to determine the fastest boat and the best foiling sailors on Sydney Harbour. The support of Marlow Ropes will provide the availability of three racing areas and organization for the first foiling year event.

The Gurit Forum will allow participants to meet the most advanced Australian designers, boat builders and sailors, sharing their experiences, ideas and future paths. Starting on the morning of Friday 12th, people like Andrew McDougall, Charles Viviani, Rob Denney, Jack McCartney, Ian Ward, Brett Ellis, Brett Goodall, James Brewer and others will present the latest development in foiling industry.
The forum is open to the public and the entry is free providing you register at:
https://old.foilingweek.com/sydney-2018/

Sustainability is one of the Foiling Week’s core values, provising a conscious way of dealing with the sport of sailing which is ecological by its very nature.
There are habits of life that even sailors tend to underestimate. Avoiding waste by not using plastic bottles, conscious use of fresh water to wash boats and equipment and differentiating waste products are just some of the actions being introduced to improve life on our planet whilst participating in our favorite sport. With this theme the Foiling Week partner Torqeedo extends the opportunity to reduce pollution and carbon footprint by using electric engines on support media and guests boats at Foiling Week events.

Foiling Week Harken Kidz Trials
On the first two days of the event, the first-ever Foiling Week Harken Kidz Trials will be held. Expert coaching and access to top-of-the-line equipment provides you with a fantastic opportunity to learn the art of foiling from the best out there – And it’s free! Get your application in today!

Here’s how it Works
• Kids aged 13 – 21 apply to participate in the Harken Kidz Trials.
• Harken and Foiling Week review the applications and choose eight (8) sailors for each event.
• You don’t have to be the best sailor. You just have to turn in the best application.
• If accepted, all you need to do is get yourself to the regatta, we’ll do the rest.
• Accepted applicants are required to submit a signed parental release waiver prior to participation.

Apply now: https://harkenblockheads.com/feed/foiling/

Foiling Week Foiling Trials
On the last two days of the event, January 13th and 14th there will also be the possibility for all sailors to try foiling boats assisted by coaches and safety boats, with sessions dedicated to women and run by female foiling sailors. To participate the All Sailor Foiling Trials please apply here: https://old.foilingweek.com/sydney-2018/

Thanks to SLAM, Foiling Week has been able to create an event tour that this year touches three continents. Sydney is the first of the year and also the first down-under. After the Sydney stop-over, Foiling Week will be at Shake-A-Leg in Biscayne Bay, Miami from February 15th to 18th.
This year, the Classic Garda Foiling Week will be from June 28th to July 1st at Fraglia Vela Malcesine as usual.

Appliances Online, leader in the Australian online appliances and white goods industry since 2004, will support Foiling Week Sydney. Appliances Online has been supporting local sailing regattas and championships for years. Foiling Week is the event that in 2018 will bring together in the local Australian foiling community with the contribution of Appliances Online donating prizes to the competitors.

More info
Gurit
Slam
Marlow Ropes
Harken
Torqeedo
Appliances Online

The Foiling Week, A Year In Review

Advancing the Community Concept for Innovation

by Christopher Museler

When the Foiling Week set up its first tents along the sparkling shoreline of Lake Garda in 2014, a small group of excitable and tweaky designers, engineers and sailors gathered to share, learn and collaborate. Once all alone in their corners of the sport and the world, this was their moment to go beyond their own visions and advance the new field of “foiling” on the water.

A mind-blowingly short time later, as 2017 comes to a close, Foiling Week is on three continents, there are more than a dozen established foiling classes and the seeds of foiling’s place beyond sailing are sprouting across the world.

Luca Rizzotti, Founder: “In 2018 we are going for the first time to exciting locations like Sydney and Miami. We look forward to connecting with the amazing Australian and American foiling communities, tap into their latest innovations and spread the know-how around the globe. Garda is also promising to be bigger than ever with many requests from new classes. Finally, we see we are growing alongside our present partners and aim at having more on board to keep the foiling community ahead of the innovation curve, plus seeking impact investments for some of our new ambitious projects.

At the heart of innovation within the foiling space, Foiling Week sits alone as a forum. But this is not an exclusive club. Forums in Europe, the United States and Australia are now opening up doors and networks that were once, by the very nature of competitive events like the America’s Cup and even geography, barriers to collaboration and development.

Cup designers once muzzled by NDAs eagerly bat around concepts with their counterparts at Foiling Week. Product developers racing to become “first-to-market” in the auto-foiling SUP space are able to explore production and distribution complications together. From the innovator to the end user, there is no doubt that this is a particular moment in foiling that transcends the sparks ignited by classes like the Moth, A Class catamaran and America’s Cup boats.

Foiling Week’s Responsibility

Following the success of the Foiling Week Newport, USA in 2016, the first forum outside of Garda, the event not only expanded to other nations, the 2017 event on that natural playground in central Italy pushed the boundaries of innovative forums into the social responsibility realm.

Though Foiling Week is not an authoritative organization, its participants are a community of new authorities on this burgeoning area of innovation. And, as the most diverse, intelligent and creative individuals in sailing, they have a resulting camaraderie and drive to improve the sport and the world through their abilities.

Core values for Foiling Week were established in 2017 after the successes of the Safety Forum in Newport. Safety, accessibility and sustainability were each given a day at this year’s Garda event.

As the sun warmed the cliffs, before the clockwork thermal breeze drifted in, the sports’ and industry’s top minds dug deep into these topics with an engaged audience. Olympic gold medalist Jo Aleh and Moth sailor Josie Gliddon, both representing the Magenta Project, lead the accessibility forum by tackling the gender issues faced with women in professional sailing. Gliddon was able to condense the concept that hydrofoiling across the range of sailing craft in the sport increases access to women. In short, with reduced loads, requiring less brute force and more technique-based skills, foiling should open doors for women. But she is quick to point out that the sailing culture lags behind these innovations and some doors are still closed.

Josie Gliddon: “To continue to talk about accessibility for all in our sport allows us to address the equality and diversity challenges we face not just for men and women. We are extremely fortunate to be in a sport where boats can be designed and adapted and I think that we can go much further in this area. Even just small changes can make a difference – putting in extra purchases / ratchet blocks or having extra people on board results in strength and psychical size becoming less of a dominant feature that in turn opens up more opportunities to more people. That can only be a good thing.”

The same forum announced design efforts to allow disabled sailors to foil and gain instruction with a Paralympic champion on hand to lend insight. Legions of tiny boys and girls also donned helmets and life jackets to safely explore this third dimension of sailing.

Sustainability, that mystical term that covers everything we need to do to save the planet, is a value Foiling Week has brought to a tangible concept. Right off the bat, the Garda event offered entry discounts to presenters and participants who carpooled to the lake. Collaborations that highlighted the outrageous inefficiencies in the use of motorboats to run regattas have led to concepts that include automated, solar-powered mark set drones.

As for safety, the Newport forum produced a collection of sailors and race management officials from around the world who, independently, had been creating race management tools and instructional interactive videos to address the growing issues that arise from boats going three- to four-times the speed of previous race craft.

On the Water

The forums now spread around the world have become synergistic moments for the greatest brains in sailing to connect and collaborate on technical and social levels. But Foiling Week has tapped into the child-like excitement these and other participants have regarding exploring and experimenting on the sea with wind and craft.

The most advanced classes in the world are attracted to each Foiling Week venue to host championships and share their progressive crafts with the world. Beyond top designers and engineers, the elite sailors of the world place Foiling Week at the top of their event wish list each year.

Glen Ashby: “For me, to walk around the boat park is absolutely fantastic.
There are so many clever people that have worked on a lot of different foiling boats and apparatus over the last few years.
For everyone to be able to walk around, share information openly and look at all the different concepts that have been built is absolutely wonderful.

Francois Gabart: “I think it is just perfect, the Foiling Week, because there is a lot happening now in the foiling world.
It’s good to mix all together.

Beyond Sailing

One would think that foiling is now established and that there is a plateau, apres’ 2017 America’s Cup, in innovation with these technologies slowing influencing recreational sailing and speeds steadying out for the professional foiling craft. But the Foiling Week has matured, and its free thinking drive for pure innovation is expanding.

Paul Larsen, one of the fastest sailors in the world having set the outright world speed record aboard Vestas SailRocket, gave Foiling Week a taste of the direction foiling can take the world. A privately funded design challenge has Larson developing a 100-foot transatlantic passenger ship that is a hybrid power/sail. “one idea is to take paying passengers across the ocean in luxury as fast as the Ultime trimaran Banque Populaire,” says Larsen.

This unique project has been combining a fabulous collection of old and new ideas. A Polynesian “proa” style set of hulls means the ship can only sail on one tack and must “shunt” to change tacks.

These fascinating terms tied to the dawn of navigation and civilization were linked by Larsen to the futuristic concept of “energy farming.” Larson says battery banks store energy generated by hydrogeneretors while the wing sailed craft reaches across through the depressions of the Atlantic then uses this stored energy to power the low-drag hulls through the glass of high pressure systems. The same ship is envisioned to double as transport for commerce, similar to cruise ships efficient use of their holds as dry docks to transport yachts across oceans.

New Ground

Now, how does the rest of the world learn about what these innovators and collaborators are working on? The Foiling Week! And although this forum has been expanding, a primary aim of the organizers is to push the boundaries of online communication by making all presentations live and archived on as many media platforms as possible. Virtual reality and interactive experiences are also imperative.

Creating more and varied partnerships into the varied spaces outside the marine industry is also a must for Foiling Week to achieve its lofty goals of connecting more spaces and innovators. BMW, Slam, Gurit, Persico Marine, Marlow, Torqeedo and Ingemar have all been rightfully supportive of getting innovators together.

The efficiencies developed by the Foiling Week community fit flawlessly with the direction innovators want to take the world. Individuals like Paul Larsen, Jo Aleh and Jossie Gliddon see an endless horizon of possibilities. So does the Foiling Week.

Foling Week Gurit Forum Day 3 – Theme ‘Accessibility’

The formal speaking section of the Forum began with a round table discussion with a diverse group, debating the accessibility of the sport across gender, age and ability.

The full and engaged audience listened to Magenta Project ambassadors Jo Aleh and Josie Glidden kick off the discussion describing physical, psychological and cultural challenges women face in sport.

Even though the professional foiling classes require a tremendous amount of strength and agility, Aleh believes that whilst technology is making the boats easier to sail, it is obvious to her that the role of women in current boats is behind the helm. “Foiling is giving more opportunities to women sailors than ever before.”

Audience member Don Montague, an originator of modern kite surfing, offered the suggestion that proposals be given to classes and events to shape the make up of fleets. “Everyone is supportive of what you are trying to do” Montague added.

The panel accepted that there are still cultural barriers to increasing the numbers of female participants in sailing but that the introduction of new class rules can help shift the gender balance.

Increasing participation for children was a goal tackled by Adriano of the Waszp class, building on the concept of role models mentioned earlier in the Forum by noting the impact of female coaches bringing young sailors throughout the week.

Filippo Ciarchi described an ambitious initiative between Acque Libere Association, top foil designer Guillaume Verdier and Italian Boat builders Persico Marine, to design a 3 – 4 person foiler for able bodied and disabled sailors to foil together.

Ciarchi added that in foiling boat trials at Foiling Week Garda,
“We had a disabled sailor who test sailed the F101 and was foiling within minutes”

There was an abundance of presenters updating progress on existing foiling projects and exciting concepts for production and entry level foilers.

High speed pioneer Paul Larsen of Vestas Sail Rocket explored the successes and failures of his previous campaigns and gave a glimpse into a future trans-oceanic foiling motor sailer that has the capacity to transport goods or people in comfort. Though most of the project is conceptual and under wraps, Larsen believes developing the concepts from his world record hunters have real applications in ocean sailing and the utilisation of renewable energy.

A broad range of designs were shared with the Forum from a trio of solar electric foilers to a purpose built foiler for sailing schools and a luxury 60ft catamaran designed as part of a Masters thesis.

Included in these presentations were the Sea Air, a foiling Mini Transat and a primer on the expensive analysis tools for engineering these fantastic craft by Paolo Manganelli from event sponsor Gurit.

The final day of 2017 Foiling Week Garda includes a v20 Electric foiling solar powered demonstration and races for all classes followed by the prize giving and buffet at host club Fraglia Vela Malcesine.

Foling Week Gurit Forum Day 1

The first day of the Gurit Foiling Week Forum focused on the core subject of Safety.

John Craig – (PRO 2013 America’s Cup and deputy PRO 2017 America’s Cup) and (Regatta Director for the Extreme Sailing Series), spoke about the lessons learnt from the last two editions of the America’s Cup and the need to continue to improve race management at major high performance regattas.

After discussions at Foiling Week Newport in 2016, a World Sailing (Safety Working Group) was established to initially draft racing rules and safety requirements for ‘fast boat events’ predominantly aimed at professional events with on the water umpires.

With accidents at both the 2013 and 2017 Americas Cup still very raw and close calls at other regattas including the Extreme Sailing Series, particular attention focused on the 3 boat length zone and the ultimate requirement for much greater room for safe mark rounding and also the training of support boat/media boats as part of the race management safety plan. Even with chase boat qualifications the support boats/media boats need to be much further away from race course marks in Craig’s view.

“We still have a long way to go” he said on progress, “but at least there is momentum.”

International Moth Class President, Scott Babbage has come straight from Bermuda as part of SoftBank Team Japan to get some valuable practice time on the waters of Lake Garda. With an entry list of more than 220 boats, this years Worlds will be the biggest fleet ever and a logistical hurdle in terms of race management.

Scott is aware of the issues and advises us that the fleet will be split into groups and raced on separate race courses. Scott also told the Forum that the class has a great respect for the 3 boat length rule in the zone and that the class is to a degree self policing, but that specific race rules have not been necessary for big regattas to date, but it is something the Moth class continues to monitor.

At the Forum experts like Francesco Feletti, an extreme sports medicine specialist and Marcello Bencini from Dainese, who created the body armour for Emirates Team New Zealand, showcased the protective gear created specifically for high performance sailing competitors.

Davide Tagliapietra, a structural engineer for Groupama Team France said,
“Its up to us to put pressure on the rule makers to include human safety in the design packages of our foiling craft, for example impact and protection around cockpits”.

The Forum then heard from teams involved in the 35th Americas Cup in Bermuda. Andy Claughton from LandRover BAR shared his perspective on how the kiwis got the upper hand in the 2017 Americas Cup by providing an insight into the strategies that helped the team win back the ‘Auld Mug’.
On the successful Emirates Team New Zealand team he said,

It took 5 years for the sailors to expand their confidence and sail this design without freaking out

The kind of mentally that ETNZ had was, “Throw the ball as far as you could and try and reach it

Sailing these boats is like balancing a pencil on the top of your finger.

The Round Table discussion included Bobby Kleinschmidt (Appendage designer at ETNZ) who briefed the Forum on the trickle down effect of knowledge and analysis from the Americas Cup.

The exciting thing for me is that we are able to use technology developed in industry and apply it to sailing

The immediate trickle down is that people working on these cup boats will be working on other boat designs in the future.

The Forum on day 2 (Friday) will focus on the core topic of ‘Sustainability’ including a sustainable Mini 6.5 craft and innovative ways to reduce emissions in regatta management.